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Whether it’s a nick or full circumcision, female genital mutilation is about control: Paradkar

In some cultures, talking about sex is taboo, as is talking about genitals. The taboo allows for vagueness to conveniently mask what is essentially a caging of female desire.

Seven years old.

Unsuspecting girls, told by their mothers they are being taken some place special. That place, a darkened room, where they are held down, their little legs parted and a blade brought down to slice off the hood of the clitoris or even the clitoris, itself.

This week, lawyers south of the border said they planned to mount a religious exemption defence after a U.S. federal jury indicted two Detroit-area doctors and the wife of one of the doctors in April for scheming to perform Female Genital Mutilation. This is horrifying. FGM was outlawed in the U.S. in 1996. It is also a criminal offense in Canada.

A cultural practice that began millennia ago and wound its way through Africa, the Middle East and 19th century U.S. medical practice, still affects millions of women around the world. FGM ranges from genital nicks and scrapes to wholesale cutting and stitching up, often by untrained hands.

Among Dawoodi Bohras, a small sect of Ismaili Shia Muslims from India and Pakistan, the 600-year-old practice takes a milder, but still indefensible form of mutilation.

Haram ki boti, is what that delicate part of the body is called in Gujarati. Sinful flesh.

Its removal “moderates the (sexual) urge . . . so there’s less chance of extra-marital affairs,” says a woman in the eye-opening 2012 documentary called A Pinch of Skin (viewable on YouTube).

Women on various forums recall harrowing experiences of pain, confusion over the duplicity of their mothers and grandmothers and repression from the silence or dismissiveness that follows.

“It’s an incongruous experience of something terrifying happening and people saying it’s no big deal,” says Toronto resident Farzana Doctor, 46, a registered social worker in private psychotherapy practice and a novelist, who belongs to the Dawoodi Bohra community. “You grow up and never made sense of it, and then you’re told you have to do it to your daughter.”

Although FGM is not considered an Islamic practice, in this sect, which is otherwise known for progressive attitudes on women and education, those who practice it consider it a religious requirement.

How does faith blind you so much that you’d place your little girl on a risk-filled path of pain?

Clearly, a few Bohra women wondered, too. The issue of FGM resurfaced after their concerted efforts to bring the hushed conversation out in the public sphere began to have an impact.

2015 was a seminal year.

Farzana Doctor was one of the original signatories of a Speak Out against FGM petition on change.org in December 2015, which resulted this week in a pledge of support by India’s Women and Child Development Minister Maneka Gandhi for a proposed anti-FGM law.

In November of that year, five women from the diasporic community, including a Canadian researcher, set up Sahiyo, a non-profit organization to end genital cutting.

Also that month, three people from the community were convicted in Australia of FGM, the first such prosecution in that country.

I can only hope no court in the U.S. ever allows girls to be abused under the guise of religion.

Abuse, because we’re not talking about adult women opting for designer vaginas. This is about cutting off a body part of a minor incapable of consent. And it holds true for circumcision of girls — and of boys, a practice that is widely carried out in North America.

But there the equivalence ends.

Circumcision of boys, a controversial and emotionally charged topic, is almost always by medical doctors (and not by a razor blade in a dark room), so you could say there is some comfort in a reduced risk of harm.

Science scrambled to catch up with that cultural practice and has thrown up contradictory results.

Female circumcision has no known medical benefits.

Then there is an added insult in the Bohra community. Circumcision of boys is openly celebrated. For girls, “it’s a very secretive practice,” says Doctor. “Often, the men don’t even know it’s happening to their daughters.”

So shrouded is it in secrecy that a celebration held after the cutting doesn’t even mention the girl has undergone khatna, the circumcision.

Get wounded, then hide in shame.

Like parents who circumcise their boys, women do this to their girls believing it to be in their interest.

In reality, in whose interest is it?

“It does damage to nerve endings,” says Doctor. “There’s psychological harm that makes them (women) afraid of sex. There’s pain during sex, risk of infections.”

Stories by affected women indicate it’s about male sexual insecurities.

“When a woman’s urge is moderated, many sins are eliminated from society,” says a young woman in A Pinch of Skin.

Urge to do what? To seek attention? To have sex? To have orgasms?

There’s no clarity on this, because talking about sex is taboo, as is talking about genitals.

The taboo allows for vagueness to conveniently mask what is essentially a caging of female desire.

Circumcision, whether it’s a symbolic nick, as some now claim, or a removal of the clitoral hood or clitoris, is a mark of sexual control over female bodies in this traditionally entrepreneurial culture where men travelled far as traders and were away from their wives and families for a long time.

It’s an interference that hoodwinks women into confining little girls in a chastity belt.

No such restraints for the travellers.

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The Spanish masturbation expert Fran Sanchez Oria argues: "Masturbating for great sexual health… can increase your testosterone levels, specially when combined with ejaculation edging. I could probably make another post just on this, but in a nutshell if you masturbate until you are close to climax then stop, and repeat several times, your testosterone levels will build up significantly." Caught with his pants down, Fran Sanchez Oria (subsequently removed the page, but a printscreen is here and here.

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Molecule of the Month - Mustard Gas

Mustard gas is the common name given to 1,1-thiobis(2-chloroethane), a chemical warfare agent that is believed to have first been used near Ypres in Flanders on 12th July 1917. Its chemical formula is Cl-CH2-CH2-S-CH2-CH2-Cl

Its other names include H, yprite, sulfur mustard and Kampstoff Lost, but the name mustard gas became more widely used, because the impure "agent quality" is said to have an odour similar to that of mustard, garlic or horseradish. When pure, it is in fact both odourless and colourless.

It was synthesised much earlier than its first reported use, by a man named Frederick Guthrie in 1860, who reacted ethylene with Cl2, and noticed the toxic effects it had on his own skin. The effects of mustard gas exposure include the reddening and blistering of skin, and, if inhaled, will also cause blistering to the lining of the lungs, causing chronic impairment, or at worst, death. Exposure to high concentrations will attack the corneas of the eyes, eventually rendering the victim blind.

Any area of the body which is moist is particularly susceptible to attack by mustard gas, because although it is only slightly soluble in water, which makes it difficult to wash off, hydrolysis (the splitting of a compund by water) is rapid, and occurs freely.

It is important to note here that not only are mustard gas and hemi-mustard both vesicants (blister skin), but the hydrolysis reaction also produces three molecules of HCl, which in itself is a skin irritant.

Despite the ease of hydrolysis, mustard gas in its solid form has been found to last underground for up to ten years. This is because, in an environment where the concentration of water is relatively low, the reaction pathway is able to proceed once, thiodiglycol is formed using most of the water available at the solid surface, but then the sulfonium intermediate reacts with this instead of another molecule of water, as the concentration of water molecules at the bulk surface is now lower than the concentration of thiodiglycol. This produces stable, non-reactive sulfonium salts, which form a protective layer around the bulk material, and therefore prevent further reaction.

Mustard gas is a paticularly deadly and dehabilitating poison, but its real danger when it was first used in WW1, compared to other chemical warfare agents at the time, was the fact that it could penetrate all protective materials and masks that they had available at the time. In more recent years, urethane was discovered to be resistant to mustard gas, and also to have the advantages of being tough, resistant to cut growth, and to be stable at a wide range of temperatures.

One of the reasons that exposure to mustard gas must be prevented, rather than cured, is that detoxification is quite difficult due to its insolublity, and that the effects of mustard gas are devastating - essentially if the inhalation of the mustard gas itself does not kill you, it is very likely to cause cancer later in life. During WW1, doctors were fairly helpless for treating victims, as the only means of detoxification was by oxidation with hypochlorite bleaches - NaOCl- and (CaCOCl-)2 (a super-chlorinated bleach) were most commonly used.

Detoxification is no longer such a problem, as there are several methods developed in recent years which are quite efficient. Both sulphur amines (sulphur dissolved in amines) and magnesium monoperoxyphthalate have been found to quite good decontaminants, but, the best method is the use of peroxy acids (RCOOH, where R=C7H15, C9H19, C11H23, C13H27 ), as they react within a few seconds, and this rate of reaction can be enhanced further by use of a catalyst.

Mustard Gas as an Anti-Cancer Agent

Mustard gas has always been seen as a particularly nasty poison, resulting in a painful and often slow death, and, ironically, whilst it causes cancer, it has also been used to help cure it. It was in 1919, not long after the first usage of mustard gas, that it was noted that victims had a low blood cell count, because the mustard gas attacked white blood cells, and bone marrow aplasia (breakdown).

Research then began in 1946 to show that nitrogen mustards (differing only from mustard gas due to the presence of a nitrogen atom, not a sulphur atom) reduced tumor growth in mice, via a mechanism whereby 2 strands of DNA are linked by a molecule of nitrogen mustard.

It had already been shown that the sensitivity of the bone marrow of mice to mustard gas is similar to that of humans, and therefore resarch lead to clinical trials, and nitrogen mustards became part of modern chemotherapy treatment, being mainly used as a cure for cancer of the lmyph glands - Hodgkin's Disease.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Duck Sex and the Patriarchy

Four years ago, as the country was wrestling with a federal-budget crisis, conservative news outlets turned their attention, once again, to the topic of wasteful government spending. That March, a reporter with CNS News, a Web site devoted to countering “liberal bias” in the media, came across what seemed to be the quintessential example of such waste—a National Science Foundation grant to Yale University for a study of duck penises. Within days, the story had made its way to Fox News. “It’s part of President Obama’s stimulus plan, and it’s just one example of the kind of spending decisions that have added up to massive debt and deficits,” Shannon Bream told viewers. The following week, Sean Hannity piled on. “Don’t we really need to know about duck genitalia, Tucker Carlson?” he asked. To which Carlson responded, with a smirk, “I know more than I want to know already!” The controversy, dubbed Duckpenisgate by Mother Jones, roared back to life some months later, when Senator Tom Coburn, of Oklahoma, included the N.S.F. grant in his “Wastebook 2013.” At $384,949, it accounted for only a thousandth of one per cent of all the spending that Coburn had tallied up, but it made headlines again. Clearly, the combination of money, sex, and power—your money, ducks’ sex, and Ivy League power—was irresistible to the graying male demographic for conservative news.

I followed Duckpenisgate with particular trepidation, since I was one of the co-investigators on the maligned study. For the past decade, in collaboration with Patricia Brennan, of Mount Holyoke College, and other colleagues, I have explored the sexual behavior and genital evolution of waterfowl. Contrary to what Carlson thinks, it is a fascinating business. It can also be shockingly brutal. In the wintry months before breeding begins, male ducks flaunt their plumage, putting on dramatic courtship displays in an effort to entrance a mate. The females can be choosy, often picking a male only after extensive deliberation. (Their preferences tend to coalesce, like a genetic fashion trend, around a shared ideal of male beauty, with each species evolving off in its own distinct aesthetic direction.) When spring arrives, the pairs migrate together to the breeding grounds. But, as the nest-building and egg-laying season approaches, unpaired males start causing trouble. Many attempt to force copulation with paired females, sometimes even ganging up on them in groups. The female ducks resist strenuously; often they are injured, or even killed, in the process.

The males’ sexual attacks are made possible by the fact that, unlike most birds, ducks still have a penis. It is not, however, an organ that most humans would recognize, being shaped like a counterclockwise corkscrew and possessing a ribbed or spiky surface. Ducks’ erections are driven by lymphatic, not vascular, pressure, which means that their penises never become stiff. Rather, they erect flexibly, but explosively, into the female’s body in less than half a second. Ejaculation takes place immediately. And duck penises can be long—really long. A breeding male mallard in your typical city park has a five-inch penis. In the case of the diminutive Argentine lake duck, the penis is longer than the duck itself—more than sixteen inches.

What, exactly, is the function of these bizarre organs? To find out, Brennan dissected the genitalia of fourteen species of waterfowl. By comparing the results, we discovered that, as males have evolved longer penises with more heavily armed surfaces, females have coevolved increasingly complex vaginal structures—dead ends, cul-de-sac side pockets, clockwise spirals. We hypothesized that these twists and turns create a mechanical barrier to the penis, frustrating forced intercourse and lowering the likelihood of a female duck being fertilized against her will. Our subsequent experiments—high-speed videos of duck penises erecting into glass tubes of various shapes—suggested we were right. (Our observations also revealed that when a female duck solicits sex with a chosen mate, her cloacal muscles dilate to allow uninhibited entry.) The result is that, even for species in which nearly forty per cent of all copulations are violently coerced, only between two and five per cent of ducklings come from extra-pair matings. As a method of contraception, ducks’ vaginal barriers can be ninety-eight-per-cent effective—a level of reliability that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration would readily approve.

A female duck’s vaginal barriers cannot shield her from physical harm. On an evolutionary level, though, they protect her in another way—by allowing her to choose the father of her offspring. If she has ducklings with her chosen mate, then they will inherit the fancy plumage that she and other females prefer. But, if she is fertilized by force, then her offspring will inherit either random display traits or traits that she has specifically rejected as less attractive. These extra-pair offspring will, on average, be less attractive to their peers, which could mean fewer grand-ducklings for the mother duck—and fewer of her genes passed on to posterity. By using her vaginal barriers, she is able to maintain her sexual autonomy in the face of sexual violence. Freedom of choice, in other words, matters to animals; even if they lack the capacity to conceptualize it, there is an evolutionary difference between having what they want and not having it. Unfortunately for female ducks, though, evolving complex vaginal structures doesn’t solve the scourge of sexual violence; it exacerbates it. Each advance results in males with longer, spikier penises, and the coevolutionary arms race continues.

Although many duck species are trapped in costly and unproductive sexual battles, other birds have pursued different evolutionary paths toward male disarmament. In bowerbirds, for instance, females have used mate choice to transform male behavior in ways that have advanced their own sexual autonomy. Male bowerbirds build elaborate seduction theatres, called bowers, out of sticks, which they decorate with gathered artifacts such as feathers, fruits, and flowers. When the time comes to breed, females visit a number of prospective mates, choosing one based on the attractiveness of the male, his bower, and his ornaments. As a result, the architecture of the bowers is shaped by females’ aesthetic preferences. Males work from a blueprint that actually prevents them from successfully coercing copulations. A so-called avenue bower, for example, features two parallel walls of sticks. The female sits cozily between them while the male does his dance at a safe remove. To copulate with her, he must go around the walls and mount her from behind, which gives her a chance to pop out the front, if she prefers, with her freedom of choice intact.

cientists admonish one another, often with good reason, to avoid anthropomorphizing animals. But they themselves regularly redraw the line between good science and anthropomorphism as a way of policing scientific discourse and favoring particular ideas. Most of us, for example, learned a strictly adaptationist version of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution; we were told that almost every feature of the biotic world, no matter how tiny, could be explained by how it contributed to an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce. In fact, though, Darwin also proposed a theory of sexual selection, in which animals may choose their mates according to aesthetic standards—their own subjective desires. This view has frequently been rejected as too anthropomorphic precisely because it implies that sexual selection can act independently of natural selection—an unsettling thought for the typical adaptationist. When it comes to the sexual politics of birds and people, there are, of course, enormous differences. Birds don’t have elaborate social cultures, money, or any notion of their own histories. Humans do. But, in seeking to understand the complexities of human evolution and sexuality, we can learn a lot by examining the diversity of life on Earth and acknowledging the parallels where they exist.

Consider, for a moment, that the sexual arms race between male and female ducks is not really a fair fight. While male ducks evolve to gain physical and sexual control over females, female ducks evolve to assert, and reassert, their freedom of choice. Sound familiar? The human “war of the sexes” is similarly one-sided. Contemporary anti-feminists often portray men as victims of the coercive social control of women, even as they actively organize to diminish women’s sexual autonomy by impeding their access to health care, contraception, and abortion. But this view is a grotesque distortion. Like convoluted duck vaginas, feminism is about autonomy, not power over men. Although one is genetic and the other is cultural, the asymmetry in ducks between the male push for power and the female push for choice is mirrored in the ideologies of patriarchy and feminism.

If ducks reflect our cultural present, bowerbirds may illuminate both our evolutionary origins and our social future. It is well established that our ape ancestors were more violent than we are. But the traditional evolutionary mechanisms—natural selection and male-male sexual competition—have not yet produced a satisfying explanation for why this violence declined and coöperative social cognition flourished in its place. In my forthcoming book, “The Evolution of Beauty,” I propose that, as in some birds, female mate choice among our forebears transformed male behavior. Since the time of our last common ancestry with chimpanzees, millions of years ago, it may have contributed to the de-weaponization of maleness, including the elimination of self-sharpening male canine teeth, the reduction in male body size relative to females, the elimination of infanticide by ascendant alpha males, and the origin of paternal investment in their offspring. By evolving to regard violent, antisocial maleness as unsexy, females may have instigated the evolution of many elements critical to our biology, including big brains, language, and even our capacity for self-awareness and reflection.

At first, the idea that humans evolved through the expansion of female sexual autonomy would seem to conflict with the fact that, practically everywhere on the planet, men are socially dominant. But this phenomenon is, I maintain, more cultural than biological. Men and women are closer to each other in size than are the famously peaceful, and non-hierarchical, male and female bonobos. How could male dominance be a result of biological destiny in people but somehow not in bonobos? Here again, the coevolutionary dynamics of duck sex may clarify how men came to regain social control over female sexuality. Like a cultural version of the toothy spikes on a ruddy duck’s penis, patriarchy may have arisen as a cultural countermeasure, reversing the advances in female autonomy gained in the millions of years since hominins diverged from chimpanzees. When sexism becomes unacceptably antisocial and hopelessly unsexy, then patriarchy may finally give up its remaining weapons.

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That armies are mad up of men is something that has to end. Draft women into combat troops. Expose women to the same kind of dangers that men have faced throughout history. Hard labour for female convicts!

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‘Masters of Sex’ Recap: I Will Fix You

If only lives could be mended as easily as a bit of nail polish can fix a run in a woman’s stocking, or as quickly as a lullaby can soothe a baby.

Or as sweetly as shared confidences can build friendships.

Lester (Kevin Christy) and Barbara (Betsy Brandt) seem to hope that by swapping secrets and facing the truth about their own sexual problems they can find a path toward healing and resolution, something that Dr. William Masters has failed to provide.

They confess to having given up on sex, but there was a hint of promise for those two, in more ways than one. The same may be true for other characters in this series. But with just two episodes left in the second season, “Masters of Sex” has taken a long time to move beyond some of the underlying personal and professional conflicts that have hindered the career trajectories of these research pioneers into human sexuality Bill Masters (Michael Sheen) and Virginia Johnson (Lizzy Caplan).

In this episode, Bill faces immense pressures at work and with his family, and is haunted by the failures in his past hospital career and fearful of being not being able to provide for his family.

Toward the end of the hour, in their elegant hotel room, Bill surrenders any pretense of composure as he crumples into the arms of the only person he trusts, Virginia. If the closing embrace between the two – and Bill’s gasping sounds are what they appear to be – the couple’s complex relationship is shifting into another level of discovery.

Betty’s Best Lines From the start, Bill faces the realities of running a business as the lights literally go out in his offices while he’s examining a patient. And Betty Moretti (Annaleigh Ashford) comically explains to Bill that the clinic’s financial condition is fairly bleak in part because he keeps rejecting possible tenants for the building as too unseemly for his patients to encounter.

If he won’t agree to leasing more space, she argues, he’ll “be doing pelvic exams with a miner’s lamp stuck to your forehead.” And if they don’t achieve a stronger footing come winter to pay for heating, she threatens to hose down the marble floors and turn the lobby into a commercial skating rink.

The Rush of Rivalries Upon learning that another researcher has published a study on sexual dysfunction in a medical journal, Bill worries that their own work will be eclipsed. He suggests to Virginia that they hire a publicist to plan how best to attain recognition.

While she initially dislikes the idea — mentioning the expense — she warms to the notion once Bill introduces her to a public relations expert, Shep Tally, who is played by none other than the guest star and director of this episode, Adam Arkin.

Bill tells Virginia that Mr. Tally represented Dr. John Rock, one of the researchers who developed the birth control pill (which was approved in 1960 for general use as a contraceptive).

But when the two of them begin arguing over the pace of their work and how to present it publicly, Shep seems charmed by their back-and-forth and proposes putting them on television. “The two of you could finally teach America how to have sex,” he says.

Later, Bill balks at hiring Shep, fretting to Virginia that he was hoping to achieve renown through articles in medical journals not in TV Guide, and his ego looms quite ambitiously here. “I want to win a Nobel Prize,” Bill declares. “Imagine what will happen when grandma turns on the TV and sees the two of us discussing swollen labia.”

Most interesting to me was Bill’s reminder of the public’s revulsion at sex pioneers, notably Dr. Wilhelm Reich, a psychoanalyst whose views on the social and physical therapeutic value of orgasm first caused a stir in Europe and then here in the States after he emigrated and was selling boxes called the “orgone energy accumulator.” (It’s quite well explained in this review of Christopher Turner’s 2011 book, “Adventures in the Orgasmatron: Wilhelm Reich and the Invention of Sex.” While the review is by no means the definitive account, it’s a great synopsis. So is this one by Christopher Hitchens.)

While Reich’s boxes apparently enthralled the likes of Norman Mailer, William Burroughs and others in the 1950s and continued into the 1960s during the so-called sexual revolution, the Food and Drug Administration pursued charges against Reich when he defied orders to stop selling them and making certain claims about them. He died in prison, Bill notes, and his books were burned.

(Sometimes this show evokes such rich history that I find myself pleasantly lost in researching the references. And learning along the way with some amusement that Reich’s machine was apparently the inspiration for Woody Allen’s orgasmatron in “Sleeper.”)

Life (and Lice) Lessons for Libby My dives into history took yet another turn as Bill’s wife, Libby (Caitlin FitzGerald), refused to stay on the sidelines when Robert Franklin (Jocko Sims) and other civil rights workers began canvassing a St. Louis housing project, the Pruitt-Igoe, to solicit support for a rent strike.

Robert warns that the projects are infested with rats and lice (“I think we both know how you feel about lice,” Robert reminds her of her shameful actions toward his sister, Coral, in a previous episode). But she shows up anyway, having enlisted Virginia to be her alibi — Bill disapproves of her volunteer work with the Congress of Racial Equality. And she becomes quite pleased with herself for persuading tenants to consider the strike, although it’s more than evident that she is also seeking Robert’s approval and trying to prove to him and perhaps to Virginia and herself that she can be more than a “bored housewife.”

(Readers keep searching for a romantic blossoming between Robert and Libby. Did you catch both Bill’s and Virginia’s curious glances toward the interactions between Robert and Libby inside the CORE offices? Are those clues?)

And while the show’s writers seem intent on broadening Libby’s role into a stronger female character, which is noble, I suppose, they also use the dawn of the civil rights era to provide a historical sense of place.

A rent strike did occur in the Desoto-Carr neighborhood, with its warren of high-rise buildings where a predominantly impoverished black populace lived in the 1960s. The strike was considered one, if not the first, of such successful actions. (The buildings have their own historical place in discussions about urban renewal — you can look it up — and they have since been demolished.)

Brutal Bonds The returning appearance of Christian Borle as Bill’s brother, Frank, results in wrenching drama for the second week in a row, as their sibling rivalry descends again into a twist of memories about their father. Bill will only refer to him as a monster, and Frank’s persistent efforts to “make amends” as part of his recovery from alcoholism lead to a violent conclusion.

Everyone in their lives, from Frank’s wife, Pauline (Marin Ireland), to their mother encourages Bill to repair his relationship with his younger brother. Bill insists to Pauline that there are no fences to mend.

Yet Frank seems just as intent on yanking out even more posts in the tattered family fence, projecting his alcoholism onto his brother’s drinking, and in a scene following a car accident injuring their mother, onto her affinity for a nightly cocktail or two.

I won’t mock the 12 Steps of recovery taught to alcoholics through A.A., as Bill and his mother do in a rather unusual alignment that somehow affords them another avenue toward reconciliation. “Lullabies never worked with you,” Essie (Ann Dowd) tells Bill as she sings Bill’s baby to sleep early on in this episode. Frank, though, would hum away, she added, relating that her younger son now explains away his chipper demeanor as an act of self-preservation.

For inexplicable reasons, Bill refuses to accept Frank’s version of an unhappy childhood at the hands of their abusive father, and it winds the tension up to one of the ugliest scenes this season.

The feud over which of the two owns the most suffering-filled upbringing is a repeat refrain from last week and still confounds me. Perhaps Bill’s anger at Frank — deriding him as a “pathetic clown” and asking what kind of man would forgive their monster of a father — represents denial in its purest form of pathological repression. Frank earnestly tries to persuade Bill that his own outbursts, and his impulsive behavior, mirror their father’s behavior as a drunk.

Brutally insulting Frank as he did to his mother years ago when he banished her from the Masters household, Bill resurrects the coping mechanism he used against his father. It’s the one that he divulged to Virginia in “The Fight” episode: He yells at Frank: “I bet once he threw the first punch you begged for mercy. You know I never begged, so why did you?”

After accusing Frank of being weak, not just a sloppy alcoholic, the two brawl in Bill’s office — a blow-by-blow resort to the methods employed by their father when they were boys.

It may seem a trite ploy, the abused continuing a cycle of violence and two brothers using each other as punching bags, but nevertheless, this scene also breaks Bill wide open.

The Fixer After the fight, Bill runs to his refuge, the hotel, where Virginia had been waiting to act out another sexcapade to help Bill overcome his impotence. (An earlier scene in which Virginia tied Bill’s hands behind his back, bared her breasts but wouldn’t allow him to touch her, was depicted so sensuously that I think her methods might have cured a viewer or two.) Shocked at his bleeding wounds and bloodied shirt, Virginia rushes to comfort him. “You’re the only one who can fix me,” Bill had told her during a flashback scene in which they talked about his problems.

And only to Virginia does he finally admit that he abandoned his brother, left him behind as his replacement for their father’s abuse, and then punished him for years.

“I give up,” Bill moans. Virginia kisses his bloodied hands, holding them. He streaks her face with some of the blood running down a cut on his cheek.

Somehow, completely laid bare by his realizations and with Virginia at his side, Bill begins to heal.

Notes and Questions: There were odd scenes between Dr. Playboy (Dr. Austin Langham, acted by Teddy Sears), the new Cal-O-Metric spokesman, and this diet pill’s promoter, Flo. It’s the mirror image of Virginia’s situation with Bill, who as her employer insisted that having sex with him was part of her job description. Flo (Artemis Pebdani) demands regular sex from Austin as a guarantee of his employment, much to his consternation. (Would a female employer really have that kind of gumption in the early 1960s?)

Also not mentioned was how Dr. Lloyd Madden, the psychiatrist with whom Virginia has been posing as Barbara to seek guidance for treating her, was on to Virginia. Is it still credible for Virginia to assert that despite her relationship with a married man (Bill), his marriage is not at risk?

Do you believe, as Frank does, that Bill is an alcoholic? Certainly Bill over-drinks in tense situations, although he refuses to attribute his overall condition to imbibing too many cocktails.

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Why is sex so important? Because life is so full of shit, that without sex, it's just not worth living.

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Caverflo - another death caused by fake tongkat ali shipped from Singapore

Food Safety News

BY NEWS DESK | MAY 26, 2017

An apparently healthy US consumer has died after consuming a standard dosage of Coverflo, an instant coffee marketed as a “natural herbal” aphrodisiac. In an urgent effort to prevent further fatalities, the is now a recall nationwide. An FDA investigation found that this alleged tongkat ali, like many others originating in Singapore, contains uncontrolled amounts of prescription drugs chemicals for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

In recent months, more than 20 men have died in China, India, Southeast Asia, and Africa after consuming fake tongkat ali that actually contained uncontrolled amounts of homelab-fabricated prescription drugs. All item originated from Singapore, where the mixing of prescription drugs into food supplements is not illegal as long as they are sold abroad.

The internet retailer Amazon has been flooded with Singaporean products claiming to be tongkat ali by distributors such as "Pure Science Supplements" and "RealHerbs". Another Singaporean outfit for what is claimed to be tongkat ali was named "Herbolab".

Caverflo.com posted the recall of 25-gram packets of “Caverflo Natural Herbal Coffee” Thursday with the Food and Drug Administration.

“Caverflo.com has received a report of an individual death after use of the coffee. Caverflo Natural Herbal Coffee may also contain undeclared milk.”

The product is a combination of instant coffee and natural aphrodisiacs, according to the Caverflo website, but the recall notice warned the product can interact with prescription medications. Also, people who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk could have an allergic reaction if they consume the instant coffee.

“These undeclared ingredients may interact with nitrates found in some prescription drugs, such as nitroglycerin, and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. Men with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or heart disease often take nitrates,” according to the recall notice.

The company distributed the instant coffee direct to consumers nationwide via internet sales from August 2016 through February this year. Caverflo is notifying customers of the recall by email.

“Consumers that have Caverflo Natural Herbal Coffee which is being recalled should stop using (it), discard (it) and contact their doctor,” according to the recall notice.

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Feminism, by creating artificial scarcity of sexual resources, is responsible for much of the deadly infighting among men, as well as male suicides.

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Hyperandrogenemia due to ingestion of Butea superba

Sir,

Androgen or testosterone is an important masculine hormone. It helps construct the male appearance. Hyperandrogenemia is majorly described in of females with hirsutism, insulin resistance and polycystic ovarian syndrome. However, hyperandrogenemia in males is not frequently mentioned. In this short article, the authors report a case of hyperandrogenemia due to ingestion of Butea superba, a herb found in South East Asia. This is an interesting case of hyperandrogenemia induced by an external source. The effect of phytoandrogens is also discussed.

The patient was a Thai single male, aged 35 years, without any underlying disease (his basic annual laboratory checkup showed normal results). On presentation, the chief complaint of this patient was a feeling of increased sexual drive. He gave the history of no use of narcotic and regular intake of vitamin and nutritional supplementation. Physical examination revealed no significant abnormality. Laboratory investigations were performed which showed increased dihydrotestosterone (1512 pg/mL, reference value 250–990 pg/mL). The results of other sexual hormone related investigations in this case included dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate 328 µg/dL, free testosterone 1.7% and sex hormone binding globulin 43.24 nmol/L [no data on follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels]. The diagnosis of hyperandrogenemia in this case was therefore arrived at. Further investigation to find the source of androgen in this case was performed. With complete history taking, the clinical nutritionist could define an important problematic food component, B. superba, a local herb. The patient gave additional information that he had just taken this locally made capsule of this herb for a few weeks because he was suffering from hair loss. This patient was advised to stop ingestion of this herb, and follow-up after 1 week revealed that the patient had no feeling of increased sexual drive and dihydrotestosterone had decreased to normal level.

In general, androgen plays an important role in the sexual drive of males. Decreased androgen level is strongly related to reduced sexual activity and decreased sexual drive. This is a common problem in old males and in cases with erectile dysfunction. In males with the problem of sexual desire, androgen investigation is a useful test. In this case report, the patient also complained of increased sexual desire, which hmight have been due to exogenous hyperandrogenemeia.. Similar to hyperestrogenemia caused due to phytoestrogens, some herbal regimens might contain phytoandrogens that can lead to hyperandrogenemia. In this case, B. superba is the problematic external source of excessive androgen. This plant is considered to be a male potency herb. In animal models receiving this herb, stimulation of sexual organ has been reported. In case of human beings, there is only one previous trial using this herb for treating erectile dysfunction. The effect of this herb is comparable to that of sildenafil. However, there has never been any report on this herb in healthy males. This is the first case report on hyperandrogenemia due to ingestion of B. superba. With the widespread usage of local herbs presently, the effects of herbs need to be considered. Indeed, a previous report also mentioned genotoxicity due to large dosage ingestion of B. superba.

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The Serge Kreutz diet is the ultimate sex diet via the day-long stimulation of taste buds with chocolate.

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Cambodian necrophiliac who attempted sex act on corpse a day after the funeral arrested after falling asleep in the COFFIN

A man who tried to have sex with a corpse after digging into the grave was arrested when he fell asleep in the coffin, police in Cambodia confirmed today.

The 47-year-old man, named as Chin Chean, was caught when villagers saw his foot sticking out of the grave and told the family of the teenage girl whose body lay in the coffin.

Chin Chean told police that he started digging up the coffin at 10pm, the day after he had attended the funeral of the 17-year-old girl.

The Cambodia Daily reported that after digging down through the earth he reached the coffin and managed to open it.

He then admitted to police that he had tried to have sex with the body but because the coffin was too small he was not able to do so.

Then, he admitted, he fell asleep on top of the body.

'Villagers saw Mr Chean's foot by the grave at about 6am and told the deceased's family,' said police chief Keo Vutha of the Prey Poun community 103 miles south east of the capital, Phnom Penh.

'We don't know at this stage whether he knew the victim when she was alive,' said Mr Vutha.

But he said that Chin Chean was known to take drugs and commit unusual acts, such as running around the local pagoda naked.

'We are going to send Mr Chean to the district police for questioning before we sent him to court,' said a police spokesman.

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The Thai miracle sex herbal butea superba has strong antiviral properties. It is now investigated as a cure for AIDS.

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